a riddle

"a riddle" art journal pages by Misty Oliver-Foster
“a riddle” art journal by Misty Oliver-Foster
The next few volcanoes took me down
I was starting to feel very sorry for myself
Why couldn’t she play the piano until the next day?
music is medicine.
Finding myself covered with regular words,
it was a very long time before I dared to
believe my recklessness.
“Enough of this nonsense!”
Ugh.  She tried not to groan.
“Keep it moving!”
But she didn’t.
She just said, “No.”
The word was right under my supplies.

 

A riddle.

a change of scenery, part I

A change of scenery is good. It stimulates the senses to be in unfamiliar surroundings.  I had the privilege this summer to get out of town and take a few small trips, so I thought I’d finally get around to sharing it with you.

My first trip this summer was to see friends in Kansas City.  My dear friend Terrin had been telling me for a while about the First Friday art walk in KC, and she had a good feeling it would be something I’d be into.  So, I finally made it happen –it was even better than I expected!

Kansas City first friday

It was more like a block party than a gallery walk.  But this block party went for blocks and blocks and blocks. The galleries and streets were so crowded, many times we had to make a single-file line just to get through to the next place.  I’m not kidding, I’ve never seen so many people out for an art event.  They have a lot of good galleries there, all within walking distance, and the atmosphere was fun and casual, not like many of the pretentious gallery walks in Dallas.

photo 5

For hours, we walked from one street to the next, popping into galleries and seeing a new band performing around every corner.  There was the first group of middle-aged performers, happily playing in the corner of a parking lot,  while a range of admirers danced to “you can be my bodyguard, and I can be your long lost pal…”  Later we were greeted by a slick rock band blaring from a more official-looking stage set up.  But probably my favorite was a group of spontaneous break dancers in the middle of the street.  Traffic was at a complete stop, and the dancers and the surrounding crowd could have cared less.  I was instantly in love with this eclectic mix of people, music and art.

Judy Onofrio at Sherry Leedy Contemporary, KC, 2014  via freshpaintblog.com

One of my favorite exhibits was by Judy Onofrio  at Sherry Leedy Contemporary.  My attraction to the sculptural work made up of bleached cow bones was a surprise to myself (and the friends that were with me).  Her ability to take jawbones, vertebrae and ribs and turn them into fascinating works of art was pretty exceptional.  Most of them were wall-hangings, but there were also some large vase-like structures that were very impressive.

 

Judy Onofrio at Sherry Leedy Contemporary, KC, 2014 via freshpaintblog.com

 

I only snapped a couple of photos, but you can see more of her work at  http://www.judyonofrio.com.  And — lucky for me– the artist was actually there during the show!  I got to meet her and ask her about her process.   She told me she has a neighbor that raises cattle and allows her to collect old bones from his fields.

artists Judy Onofrio and Misty Oliver-Foster
Getting to meet artist Judy Onofrio (left).

She said that she enjoys all the parts of collecting, cleaning,  and bleaching the bones before assembling them into sculptures.  Somehow, she has devised a method to conceal all of the joints where the bones are connected, and she told me that’s also a fun process for her.  (Thanks to Terrin for snapping a pic of me talking with Ms. Onofrio).

What a fantastic way to start the summer.  I’m eager to go back up to KC and do it again soon.

 

 

 

sacred place

sacred place

 

fresh paint studio 1

“To have a sacred place is an absolute necessity… You must have a room or a certain hour of the day or so, where you do not know who your friends are, you don’t know what you owe anybody or what they owe you. This is a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be.”

– Joseph Campbell

fresh paint studio

Getting lost in my sacred place this evening.

 

 

awesome april (day 30) – i did it my way

awesome april (day 30) – i did it my way

ATC 38  23(Grace)  23 SeriesI set a challenge for myself this month to post on my blog daily, and this, my friends, is the final post for the month of April 2014.   I did it!

There were days that were a lot more inspiring than others, some very exciting with good news to share, and others that I just didn’t feel so motivated about.  But I’ve found that this has been a really good exercise for me — it has kept me focused each day, because I knew I would need to share something interesting each day with you.

Just like my journals, my blog posts are a good resource for me to see what was going on in my life at a particular time.

An overview of this month’s posts:

  • I have gotten to share some of my visual journals with you, which until this month I hadn’t published online. Posting on my blog daily has encouraged me to finish some of those journal pages that I had started but had been dragging my feet on finishing.   See awesome april posts # 18 22, 23, 25 and 27 for new journal entries, and I have a new visual journals page that I’ve been adding to all month.
  • I shared things that inspire me along the way(days # 5, 6, 7, 14 20, 28) and the advice I would give to my artist self 20 years ago (#16).
  • My trip to Europe is officially on the books, which is something I’ve wanted to do for a while.  It’s been 10 years since I traveled overseas, so I’m happy to have something fantastic to look forward to next year.  jens studio 3
  • You got a few glimpses into my studio (day # 10, 15, 26, 28),  and the studio of my friend Jennifer Cowley (day #2).  I also shared a few of my art friends (day #11 and # 24), as well as some of my students’ work in progress (day #3).
  • I’ve had a great month getting my work out there.  I revealed the news that I was selected to complete a public art mural for McKinney this spring. ( I’m still waiting on a start date, and I’ll keep you all posted on the latest  developments with that project). Meanwhile, I’ve also sold a few paintings this month, and been selected for a juried show.

Thanks to all of you who have been reading my blog this month, and to my new ‘followers.’  As always, I’d love to have comments from you on any of the posts.

Here’s looking forward to a Maniacal May.

 

awesome april (day 29) – encaustic

awesome april (day 29) – encaustic

We're Gonna Have a Good Time
We’re Gonna Have a Good Time

I have been layering found images into my paintings for the last several years, but sometimes I wanted the paint to have more surface texture.  There are many additives you can put into acrylic paint, but most of them either take a lot of layers to build up a thick surface, or they are opaque.  I wanted the texture, but still with transparency.  Enter encaustics!

I have admired encaustic work for some time – it has a very deep, luminous quality — but wasn’t quite sure how the process worked.  So, I took a couple of classes over at The Encaustic Center in Richardson and immediately knew this was a medium that I could continue to experiment with.

Portrait of a Boy, Egyptian, Roman Period 2nd Century

What is encaustic?  It is painting with heated beeswax!  It’s an old method that has been around at least 2500 years, and was used by the Greeks and Egyptians for painting everything from boats to portraits.  Find out more about the history of encaustic painting HERE.

Jasper Johns encaustic map painting, 1961

Probably one of the most notable artists from the past 50 years that employed encaustic painting in his work is Jasper Johns, famous for his paintings of maps and the American flag.

encaustic paints in my studio
encaustic paints in my studio

I make my encaustic medium (beeswax + damar resin) in a large electric skillet.  I then use oil paints to add the color (pigment) to the clear medium.  I have a separate griddle for this, with 16 oz. ink tins lined up with the colors I want to use.    This is the same setup used at the Encaustic Center, and in most books and articles I’ve read on encaustic painting.  Some artists buy their encaustic paint already made (R & F has some really good paints), but they are very expensive.

encaustic painting by Misty Oliver-Foster
And the Rain Washed it Away

What I love about encaustic is it’s a very fast, spontaneous medium.  It dries quickly (think of how fast candle wax hardens), and can be used for both additive and subtractive techniques.    You can also layer paper into your work easily — including drawings, photographs, collage, ephemera, etc.  Imagine how exciting this was for me, as I love to glue all kinds of things into my paintings!   To have a true “encaustic” painting, you have to fuse each layer together, slightly re-melting each layer to make sure it adheres to the one below it.  I use a heat gun most of the time, but have just started enjoying using a torch as well.  (However, when I add paper, I try to keep the torch far away).

In my newest series, I drew with charcoal or pastel onto tissue paper, then layered those drawings into my paintings using clear encaustic medium (clear paint, with no pigment added).  The tissue paper became so transparent, that you can hardly detect the edges in the painting.  It allowed me to “float” my drawings on top of previous layers of collage and paint.  And the drips are now in 3D!

Courage
Courage

I just added a few more encaustic pieces to my web site, which you can find HERE.

 

125 Juried Show, Plano
125 Juried Show, Plano

And I’m happy to announce that two of my larger encaustic paintings were accepted into the 125 Juried Art Show, which opened yesterday. The show is at The ARTS Gallery at Collin College, 2800 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano, TX 75074.  The show runs April 28 – May 17, with a reception on Thursday, May 8 from 5:30 – 7:30pm.