hot mess


Productivity is never pretty around here. Making art is like childbirth to me. I start out hopeful and full of promise.  At some point it makes me sick (I call it the “ugly phase”), but I keep going, knowing it’s worth the struggle. And toward the end, I will do anything – endure any torture – to get this thing finished and out of my space.


I have been finishing three new comissioned pieces – I just returned from installing one, and two more are awaiting delivery this week.

completed art for the offices of David Kesel, CPA

Meanwhile, my studio is ashambles. Unlike childbirth, there is no nesting going on here, just complete  violent, creative chaos.


As I came back into the studio this afternoon, the amount of stuff I have strewn everywhere is insane.  Paint, dirty brushes, bits of cut paper all over the table and floor, awaiting placement on some collage or journal.

 Project ideas, notes scribbled on lined paper that was torn out of some book.  Scissors, glazing medium, screwdrivers, nails, art supply catalogs, plastic bags, ideas for teaching art projects…

But it means I have been making art, and that is good. 

The A/C went out last week, just in time for summer’s last stand.   Fortunately, I am married to quite a handy man. He’s helping me out by installing a fan today.  Come on, cool weather, I need you.


And, athough I’m exhausted, I’m really thankful for this hot mess of a studio.

On to making more art.

the raven

the raven

  

If you’ve read many of my posts or been to my place, you’ll see that my garden is an extension of my studio, and a huge source of inspiration and reprieve for me.  The studio structure is a converted two-car garage, and when we moved in, there was no garden to speak of. So when we designed the interior space and added a window, the view wasn’t as big of a concern as it should have been.  (Hindsight). Fortunately, the garage also had a screened-in porch attached, and that has become one of my favorite places to think.  

  

 

This weekend, my hubby helped me out by making a little writing desk out of an old wooden palette.  It works perfectly in the space, allowing me to overlook the garden and stay mosquito-free at the same time (a huge task around here).  He lovingly named it “The Raven” a testament to his sense of humor, and a nod to his inner Mad Hatter.  

flashback to Halloween 2010

For some, rainy days and Mondays are big downers, but I happen to love both (However, I currently don’t report to “work” on most Mondays, so that most likely determines my affection). This morning brought spring rains, and I was able to clear my head while enjoying the vibrant beauty of the garden. The birds sang happily.  I even made a quirky little poem to memorialize the moment:

 

   

 

 

   And as I’m wrapping up this post, guess who perched outside my back door?   

The raven’s unglamorous Texas cousin, the grackle (as seen through the screen, from my new desk).

“Forevermore.” 

sacred place

sacred place

 

fresh paint studio 1

“To have a sacred place is an absolute necessity… You must have a room or a certain hour of the day or so, where you do not know who your friends are, you don’t know what you owe anybody or what they owe you. This is a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be.”

– Joseph Campbell

fresh paint studio

Getting lost in my sacred place this evening.

 

 

awesome april (day 30) – i did it my way

awesome april (day 30) – i did it my way

ATC 38  23(Grace)  23 SeriesI set a challenge for myself this month to post on my blog daily, and this, my friends, is the final post for the month of April 2014.   I did it!

There were days that were a lot more inspiring than others, some very exciting with good news to share, and others that I just didn’t feel so motivated about.  But I’ve found that this has been a really good exercise for me — it has kept me focused each day, because I knew I would need to share something interesting each day with you.

Just like my journals, my blog posts are a good resource for me to see what was going on in my life at a particular time.

An overview of this month’s posts:

  • I have gotten to share some of my visual journals with you, which until this month I hadn’t published online. Posting on my blog daily has encouraged me to finish some of those journal pages that I had started but had been dragging my feet on finishing.   See awesome april posts # 18 22, 23, 25 and 27 for new journal entries, and I have a new visual journals page that I’ve been adding to all month.
  • I shared things that inspire me along the way(days # 5, 6, 7, 14 20, 28) and the advice I would give to my artist self 20 years ago (#16).
  • My trip to Europe is officially on the books, which is something I’ve wanted to do for a while.  It’s been 10 years since I traveled overseas, so I’m happy to have something fantastic to look forward to next year.  jens studio 3
  • You got a few glimpses into my studio (day # 10, 15, 26, 28),  and the studio of my friend Jennifer Cowley (day #2).  I also shared a few of my art friends (day #11 and # 24), as well as some of my students’ work in progress (day #3).
  • I’ve had a great month getting my work out there.  I revealed the news that I was selected to complete a public art mural for McKinney this spring. ( I’m still waiting on a start date, and I’ll keep you all posted on the latest  developments with that project). Meanwhile, I’ve also sold a few paintings this month, and been selected for a juried show.

Thanks to all of you who have been reading my blog this month, and to my new ‘followers.’  As always, I’d love to have comments from you on any of the posts.

Here’s looking forward to a Maniacal May.

 

awesome april (day 29) – encaustic

awesome april (day 29) – encaustic

We're Gonna Have a Good Time
We’re Gonna Have a Good Time

I have been layering found images into my paintings for the last several years, but sometimes I wanted the paint to have more surface texture.  There are many additives you can put into acrylic paint, but most of them either take a lot of layers to build up a thick surface, or they are opaque.  I wanted the texture, but still with transparency.  Enter encaustics!

I have admired encaustic work for some time – it has a very deep, luminous quality — but wasn’t quite sure how the process worked.  So, I took a couple of classes over at The Encaustic Center in Richardson and immediately knew this was a medium that I could continue to experiment with.

Portrait of a Boy, Egyptian, Roman Period 2nd Century

What is encaustic?  It is painting with heated beeswax!  It’s an old method that has been around at least 2500 years, and was used by the Greeks and Egyptians for painting everything from boats to portraits.  Find out more about the history of encaustic painting HERE.

Jasper Johns encaustic map painting, 1961

Probably one of the most notable artists from the past 50 years that employed encaustic painting in his work is Jasper Johns, famous for his paintings of maps and the American flag.

encaustic paints in my studio
encaustic paints in my studio

I make my encaustic medium (beeswax + damar resin) in a large electric skillet.  I then use oil paints to add the color (pigment) to the clear medium.  I have a separate griddle for this, with 16 oz. ink tins lined up with the colors I want to use.    This is the same setup used at the Encaustic Center, and in most books and articles I’ve read on encaustic painting.  Some artists buy their encaustic paint already made (R & F has some really good paints), but they are very expensive.

encaustic painting by Misty Oliver-Foster
And the Rain Washed it Away

What I love about encaustic is it’s a very fast, spontaneous medium.  It dries quickly (think of how fast candle wax hardens), and can be used for both additive and subtractive techniques.    You can also layer paper into your work easily — including drawings, photographs, collage, ephemera, etc.  Imagine how exciting this was for me, as I love to glue all kinds of things into my paintings!   To have a true “encaustic” painting, you have to fuse each layer together, slightly re-melting each layer to make sure it adheres to the one below it.  I use a heat gun most of the time, but have just started enjoying using a torch as well.  (However, when I add paper, I try to keep the torch far away).

In my newest series, I drew with charcoal or pastel onto tissue paper, then layered those drawings into my paintings using clear encaustic medium (clear paint, with no pigment added).  The tissue paper became so transparent, that you can hardly detect the edges in the painting.  It allowed me to “float” my drawings on top of previous layers of collage and paint.  And the drips are now in 3D!

Courage
Courage

I just added a few more encaustic pieces to my web site, which you can find HERE.

 

125 Juried Show, Plano
125 Juried Show, Plano

And I’m happy to announce that two of my larger encaustic paintings were accepted into the 125 Juried Art Show, which opened yesterday. The show is at The ARTS Gallery at Collin College, 2800 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano, TX 75074.  The show runs April 28 – May 17, with a reception on Thursday, May 8 from 5:30 – 7:30pm.

 

 

 

awesome april (day 28) – anticipation

awesome april (day 28) – anticipation

R & F Paintsticks
R & F Paintsticks

There’s nothing like new art materials to make me excited.  I just got some new paint sticks last week, and have been looking forward to this week – lots of studio time.  Tomorrow is the day!

I’ve been using these a lot with my encaustic work, but also love to draw with them in my oil and acrylic paintings.

"Today I Feel Refreshed and Excited"
“Today I Feel Refreshed and Excited”

 

I also use oil sticks for many of my drawings on paper.

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I finally made some new cradled panels this weekend, too.  Thanks to my hubby for his help with these (or for letting me help him — he’s so much better at mitred corners than I am).

 

panels2

 

panels

I made these underpaintings a few months ago, but now that I have the cradles on the back, they are ready for me to layer paint and color. Who knows how much of my original painting will even be visible when I’m done (probably not much).   I can’t wait!